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Posts Tagged ‘Arabic Cooking’

BBC Good Food Middle East ~ Meet the Blogger

July 16th, 2013 7 comments

BBC Good Food Middle EastCheck out this month’s issue of BBC Good Food Middle East magazine, sold in the UAE and Qatar.

I am featured in their Ramadan issue on the “Meet the Blogger” page. The theme for the month is Arabian Delights. My favorite subject! 

So many talented food writers and bloggers have been featured here, so I’m pleased to see my photos and words on these pages.

Happy Reading & Ramadan Kareem!  

 

BBC Good Food ~ Meet the Blogger

Mujaddara ~ Palestinian Lentils & Rice

October 19th, 2012 37 comments

When my husband and I were starving university students, we ate this dish all the time—mostly because it was cheap and filling. Then at some point we stopped. We forgot all about lentils and rice for many years, as we graduated on to more “sophisticated” foods.

Recently, in an attempt to bring some vegetarian dinners to our table, I re-discovered mujaddara, so tasty, nutritious, and economical. When I presented the humble platter to my husband, he was surprised and thrilled—as though I was serving up a whole lamb or some rare delicacy.

He raved about the dish to the kids, how amazing and delicious it was—the fried onions over the cumin-flavored rice with a touch of yogurt. I suspect the taste unlocked some sentimental memories of his childhood in Palestine, where simple foods ruled the kitchen.

Lentils & rice is a classic Arab combination that goes back to medieval times. I’ve seen it prepared many ways—from a rice dish with just a bit of lentils to mostly lentils with a touch of rice. As for me, I like to make it half/half, a cup of each.

I also add a chopped up carrot. Though non-traditional, the carrot adds color and interest to an otherwise plain-looking dish.

Finally, do not skimp on the onion. More than a garnish, the onions flavor the dish in such a way that you’ll find yourself and a fellow diner fighting over the last remaining bits of onion. If you love onions, I suggest frying up three onions or even four. Trust me on this.

Mujaddara ~ Serves 4-6

1 cup brown lentils

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 large carrot, chopped finely

1 cup rice

1 teaspoon cumin

1½ teaspoons salt or to taste

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

2 medium onions (more if you love onions)

2 Tablespoons olive oil

Method

  1. Start boiling some water for use later.
  2. Wash lentils and put in large cooking pot with 2 cups cold water. Add carrots and garlic. Bring to boil, lower heat, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  3. While lentils cook, start soaking the rice. Place rice in heat-resistant bowl, cover with boiling water and stir. Soak rice for about 15 minutes.
  4. Drain rice well and mix with the cooked lentils and 1½ cups hot water. Add cumin, salt and pepper. Cover and simmer until all water is absorbed, about 15 minutes or longer.
  5. While rice and lentils cook, halve the onions vertically and slice thinly. Fry onions in the olive oil until golden brown.
  6. Transfer the mujaddara to a platter and top with the fried onion. Serve with a Simple Arabic Salad and Yogurt Cucumber Salad or simply plain yogurt.

Note: If you prefer a more traditional mujaddara, omit the carrot and reduce the hot water from 1½ cups to 1 cup in Step 4.

Questions: How do you prepare Mujaddara? What are your memories of this dish?

Simple Arabic Salad

October 16th, 2012 15 comments

This is my go-to salad to serve alongside any Middle Eastern rice dish, such as maqluba (rice and chicken) or mujaddara (rice and lentils). Indeed, this salad is simple, but there are some tricks to it.

In the Arab world, it is highly desired to have salads like this chopped teeny tiny. Regardless of how tiny one is willing to go, it’s equally important to have the cucumber and tomato pieces all uniform. The optional green pepper can be chopped even finer, as it’s more of an accent rather than the main event.

As for seasonings, a high-quality gourmet sea salt can really make this salad pop. Also, avoid overdoing it with the lemon juice; otherwise, the salad will be soupy. The mint leaves are optional.

Arabic Salad ~ serves 4-6 as a side dish

3 medium tomatoes, chopped small

2 medium cucumbers, chopped small (not peeled)

½ bunch fresh parsley, chopped finely

1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice

½ teaspoon sea salt, or to taste

½ green pepper, chopped finely (optional)

handful mint leaves, chopped finely (optional)

Method

  1. Mix all the ingredients together. Check for a balance of red and green. If necessary, add more tomatoes or more of the green stuff.
  2. Taste and adjust the seasonings if necessary. I like to add a final sprinkle of sea salt.

Question: How do you make your Arabic Salad?